Tommy Simpson

This remarkable image capturing the true spirit of LeTour has been created by Artist James Straffon for the 100 day cultural festival of Yorkshire. The original production hangs outside The Factory building at Poliform North in Harrogate’s town centre and 200mtrs from the finish line of day one The Grand Depart Yorkshire.  To withstand the Yorkshire climate, the original 8 images are produced in a high quality polymeric self-adhesive vinyl. Finished with an exterior grade satin laminate. Mounted onto a premium grade 3mm thick aluminium composite. Complete with print wrapped edges giving a superior finish with longevity. Its dimensions are in two parts each part being 1250mm x2500mm and totalling 2500mm x 2500mm face fixed with coach bolts.

Original set of 8 @ 2500mm x 2500mm are to be auctioned on Saturday 5th July to raise funds for The Dave Rayner foundation and Yorkshire Air Ambulance.  To register your interest or to place a bid, please contact sag@stephenneall.co.uk.

These creations can also be purchased in the following formats:
2500mm x 2500mm signed originals £ by auction.
1500mm x 1500mm signed Limited Edition of 5.
400mm x 500mm signed limited edition of 9 framed stencils.
T-shirts in white with multiple image panel.

Thomas “Tom” or “Tommy” Simpson (30 November 1937 – 13 July 1967) was one of Britain’s most successful professional cyclists. He was born in Haswell, County Durham and later moved to Harworth, Nottinghamshire. Simpson began road cycling as a teenager before taking up track cycling, specialising in pursuit races. He won a bronze medal for track cycling at the 1956 Summer Olympics and a silver at the 1958 Commonwealth Games.

Simpson’s first race as a professional was the Tour de l’Ouest.

In 1959 at age 21, Simpson was signed by the French professional road-racing team St. Raphaël-Géminiani. He advanced to their first team (Rapha-Gitane-Dunlop) the following year, and won the 1961 Tour of Flanders. Simpson then joined Gitane-Leroux-Dunlop; in the 1962 Tour de France he became the first British rider to wear the yellow jersey, finishing sixth overall.

In 1963 Simpson moved to Peugeot-BP-Englebert, winning Bordeaux–Paris that year and Milan – San Remo in 1964. In 1965 he became Britain’s first world road race champion and won the Giro di Lombardia; this made him the BBC Sports Personality of the Year, the first cyclist to win the award. Injuries hampered much of Simpson’s 1966 season. He won two stages of the 1967 Vuelta a España before taking the general classification of Paris–Nice that year.

During the 13th stage of the 1967 Tour de France, Simpson collapsed and died during the ascent of Mont Ventoux. He was 29 years old. The post-mortem examination found that he had mixed amphetamines and alcohol; this diuretic combination proved fatal when combined with the heat, the hard climb of the Ventoux and a stomach complaint. A memorial near where he died has become a place of pilgrimage for many cyclists. Simpson was known to have taken performance-enhancing drugs during his career, when no doping controls existed. Despite this, he is held in high esteem by many cyclists for his character and will to win.